CS 445 Robotics & Intelligent Systems

Catalog Description: 
Comprehensive examination of the theory and practice behind robot-building and the deployment of intelligent systems. Topics are divided between robot architectures (control paradigms, kinematics, sensors, actuators and navigation) and cognitive robotics (learning, decision-making, coordination and cooperation).
Prerequisite: 
Junior standing and CS 428 or permission of the instructor
Credits: 
3
Offered: 
Second semester—odd years
Required or Elective: 
Elective
Level: 
Advanced
Coordinator: 
George Dimitoglou
Current Textbook: 
There are no required textbooks to purchase. Notes and scholarly papers will be provided.
Topics covered: 
  • Locomotion
  • Kinematics
  • Perception-Sensors
  • Perception-Uncertainty
  • Localization-Noise, Beliefs
  • Localization-Mapping
  • Planning & Navigation
  • Robotic Simulations
  • Multi-robot coordination
  • Humanoids; Ethics
Student Learning Outcomes: 

On completing this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Have in-depth knowledge of the fundamental principles of robot system design and operation.
  2. Be able to apply concepts of translational and rotational motion, and gears to robot construction.
  3. Be able to design and program simple autonomous robots.
  4. Be able to describe, analyze and address issues related to the behavior, learning and perception of robotic systems.
  5. Be able to implement algorithms that enable the use of sensors and actuators to facilitate intelligent behavior, learning and perception.
  6. Have an appreciation of emerging robotic applications, in elds other than computing such as medical, transportation and space.
  7. Have an appreciation of emerging robotic technologies such as micro-, and nano- robots.
Relation of Course Outcomes to Program Outcomes: 

 

CS 445 Student Outcomes (SOs)
Course Learning Outcomes a b c d e f g h i j k
1. Have in-depth knowledge of the fundamental principles of robot system design and operation.                      
2. Be able to apply concepts of translational and rotational motion, and gears to robot construction.                    
3. Be able to design and program simple autonomous robots.                    
4. Be able to describe, analyze and address issues related to the behavior, learning and perception of robotic systems.                      
5. Be able to implement algorithms that enable the use of sensors and actuators to facilitate intelligent behavior, learning and perception.                    
6. Have an appreciation of emerging robotic applications, in felds other than computing such as medical, transportation and space.                      
7. Have an appreciation of emerging robotic technologies such as micro-, and nano- robots.                      

 


 

Role in Assessment: 
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